The world is hungry for cruelty-free design.

This part of the Material Age series focuses on some recent innovations and possible alternatives to leather. We feature materials made from fruit, mushrooms and even leather grown in the laboratory. (Continues…)

Some years ago we were told by many experts that soon we will all have 3D printers at home. Clearly, this has not been the case – and thankfully so. With the technology developing in such a fast pace, we can only imagine the amount of discarded printers that would be in the landfills by now. While we have come to realize that not every home will need a 3D printer, this technology has by no means been forgotten. (Continues…)

Fashioned from Nature is an exhibition at London’s Victoria & Albert Museum that explores the complex relationship between fashion and nature from 1600 to the present day. It presents fashionable dress alongside natural history specimens, innovative new fabrics and dyeing processes, inviting visitors to think about the materials of fashion and the sources of their clothes. (Continues…)

Part 4 of The Material Age series is a guest post by Omuus.

Bio Design or Synthetic biology, also called bio-engineering, is an expanding market. It is expected to exceed $13.4 billion by 2019. This field is increasingly relevant to designers and everyone working in the field of design today should at least be aware of what it is. (Continues…)

Part 3 of The Material Age series is all about slime. This still growing trend is attracting both children and kidults. (Continues…)

We know that our current way of consuming is not going to make it in the long term if we want to keep this planet alive. Thankfully, many of today’s designers are exploring new ways to innovate more sustainable materials for future products. (Continues…)

The basis for the future of design lies in material innovations. In this series of articles we explore just a few of the many ideas that the Around Team feels could make a difference and change the way we think about the materials that surround us. (Continues…)

In celebration of the 50th birthday of the iconic Tasaraita collection, art historian Anna Parviainen retraces the different phases of Marimekko’s unisex fashion and the recent history of an aesthetic freely titled Nordic unisex. (Continues…)

How does a person defend the particularity of one’s identity in a digitalized world? Hyperculture is the result of endless mixing of origins and ideas on the web. Hannaleena Heiska’s exhibition Camouflage touches not only the current theme of an individual’s right to privacy, but also the actual fluidity of identity. ”About a year ago I bumped into an article about an anti-facial recognition algorithm to conceal people’s identities with the help of make-up. The idea of hiding one’s true identity or even creating temporary one started to fascinate me.” (Continues…)

“At the moment, I’m interested in the idea of emptiness in the painting. At its best, when I feel that I have succeeded with a work, I have been able to make the painting complete in a way that it becomes empty: none of the elements in the work stick out or annoy the viewer. Everything lives together – form and color speak to each other in harmony, creating something that strikes a balance between substance and emptiness.” (Continues…)